a dull and witless child: Twilight is a tragedy rather than a romance.

panlight:

cleaningoffthestone:

Let’s put problems with spelling, grammar, narrative flow, plot structure, etc. aside and just look at the story and, in particular, the character arc of Bella Swan.

At the beginning of the story, she is moving from Arizona to Washington on her own volition - she has decided to give her mother…

Twilight reinterpreted as a .  Bella/Edward fans may wish to skip this one.  lol.  But it’s interesting.tragedy

(Source: )

Writing While Female: Romance and the Vitality of Literary Culture

oliviawaite:

Essentially what they are doing is blaming the victims of marginalization for being marginalized. It discounts the fact that there are very real, palpable forces that convince women of their own lesser worth and minimal authority. Maybe we should think about changing those structures, instead? But no — it’s not that we live in a patriarchy/kyriarchy that silences all but privileged voices — it’s that those silenced voices just aren’t yelling loud enough. (And when we do yell, we’re hysterical or emotional or irrational. ‘What a fun game!’ said no woman, ever. ‘I love not winning.’)

teachingliteracy:

invisiblestories:
“And we build a home. Word by word, sentence by sentence. We make stories, trace letters in the air, long into the night. We make.” Photograph by Anett Holmvik (via therestisbullshit)

I would tear my room apart to keep reading

teachingliteracy:

invisiblestories:

“And we build a home. Word by word, sentence by sentence. We make stories, trace letters in the air, long into the night. We make.” Photograph by Anett Holmvik (via therestisbullshit)

I would tear my room apart to keep reading

infiniteadventure:

lupinatic:

here-is-the-place:

When people say these books are children’s books, as if to demean them, I balk. These books dealt with themes that adults do not fully understand or wish to. It dealt with racism, classism, sexism, homophobia, prejudice, and general ignorance. These books taught us that it doesn’t matter how you were raised, but that you get to choose to be kind, loyal, brave, and true. They taught us to be strong under the pressures of this world and to hold fast to what we know to be right. These books taught me so much, they changed me as a person. So just because they’re set against a fantastical backdrop with young protagonists does not mean that their value is any less real.

This.

First book: Starts with the double murder of a pair of twenty-one year olds who were much missed and leaving their baby son a war orphan. A child growing up in abusive conditions that would give Cinderella the horrors. Dealing with peers and teachers who are bullies. The fickleness of fame (from the darling of Gryffindor to the outcast.) The idea that there are things worth fighting and dying for, spoken by the child protagonist. Three children promptly acting on that willingness to sacrifice their lives, and two of them getting injured doing so.

Second book: The equivalent of racism with the pro-pureblood attitude. Plot driven by an eleven year old girl being groomed and then used by a charming, handsome older male. The imbalance of power and resultant abuse inherent in slavery. Fraud perpetuated by stealing something very intimate.

Third book: The equivalent of ableism with a decent, kind and competant adult being considered less than human because he has an illness that adversely affects his behaviour at certain times. A justice system that is the opposite of just. Promises of removing an abused child from the abusive environment can’t always be kept. The innocent suffer while the guilty thrive.

Fouth book: More fickleness of fame. The privileged mistreating and undermining the underprivileged because they can. A master punishing a slave for his own misjudgment, and the slave blaming herself. A sports tournament which involves mortal risk being cheered by spectators. A wonderful young man being murdered simply because he was in the way. A young boy being tortured, humilated and nearly murdered.

Fifth book: PTSD in the teenage protagonist. Severe depression in the protagonist’s godfather, triggered by inherited mental health issues and being forced to stay in a house where abuse occured. A bigoted tyrant who lives to crush everyone under her heel, torturing a teenager for telling the truth in the name of the government (and trying to suck his soul out too). The discovery that your idols can have feet of clay after all. An effort to save the life of someone dear and precious actually costing that very same life. The loss of a father-figure and the resultant guilt.

Sixth book: The idea that a soul can be broken beyond repair. Drugs with the potential for date rape are shown as having achieved exactly that in at least one case, resulting in a pregnancy. Well-meaning chauvinism trying to control the love life of a young woman. Internalised prejuidce resulting in refusing the one you love, not out of lack of love but out of fear of tainting them. The mortality of those that seem powerful and larger than life.

Seventh book: Bad situations can get worse, to the point where even the privileged end up suffering and afraid. More internalised prejudice and fear hysterical terror of tainting those you love. Self-sacrifice and the loss of loved ones, EVERYWHERE. Those who are bitter are often so with a reason. The necessity of defeating your inner demons, even though it’s never as cool as it sounds. Don’t underestimate those that are enslaved. Other people’s culture isn’t always like your own. Things often come full circle (war ending with the death of a dearly-loved pair of new parents and their orphaned baby son living with his dead mother’s blood relative instead of his young godfather). Even if ‘all is well’ the world is still imperfect, because it’s full of us brilliant imperfect humans.

 
So… still think that Harry Potter is a kid’s series with no depth?

Note to self: Print this off, give to English teacher.

If you aren’t getting anything out of these books ‘ur doin it wrong’

(Source: fhlostonsparadise)

fuckyeahbookarts:

Bookmaking infographic: Instructions for constructing hard cover books.

fuckyeahbookarts:

Bookmaking infographic: Instructions for constructing hard cover books.

weepingangelcastiel:

peetaunhijacked:

madamecroak:

happily-hatemarried:

sherlock—kun:

masaothedog:

miabrown25:



That looks so ridiculously cosy.

Just imagine sleeping in there and there is a murderer in your house
they would never suspect it
hehe


that is so cool I want a bed like that

I’d just joke about coming out of the closet…

AND THE BOOKSHELF TOO I WANT THIS SO BAD.
MOM, DAD, WE ARE REMODELING MY ROOM RIGHT AWAY.

weepingangelcastiel:

peetaunhijacked:

madamecroak:

happily-hatemarried:

sherlock—kun:

masaothedog:

miabrown25:

That looks so ridiculously cosy.

Just imagine sleeping in there and there is a murderer in your house

they would never suspect it

hehe

that is so cool I want a bed like that

I’d just joke about coming out of the closet…

AND THE BOOKSHELF TOO I WANT THIS SO BAD.

MOM, DAD, WE ARE REMODELING MY ROOM RIGHT AWAY.

(Source: pinterest.com)

amandaonwriting:

Brentwood Library

amandaonwriting:

Brentwood Library

Nine Female Writers Who Had To Hide Their Gender

amandaonwriting:

1. Keeping it in the family, the three talented Brontë sisters published their writing under the surname Bell. Emily published Wuthering Heights as Ellis Bell, Charlotte brought out Jane Eyre as Currer Bell and Anne used Acton Bell to release The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, as well as their joint poetry collections and other works.

2. A. S. Byatt was born Dame Antonia Susan Duffy, but has been publishing writing under her androgynous pseudonym since 1964. Her novelist sister uses her birth name professionally.

3. Vita Sackville-West’s gender-confusing pen name is a shortened version of the far flouncier The Hon Victoria Mary Sackville-West, Lady Nicolson, which she was born with. Famously the lover and muse of Virginia Woolf, Sackville-West published novels and poetry under her pen name, including The Edwardians and All Passion Spent.

4. Despite bringing out the best-selling book series in history (Harry Potter, if you hadn’t heard) in 1997, J.K. Rowling was advised by her publisher to swap her full name for two initials. Born Joanne Rowling, she chose ‘K’ from her grandmother Kathleen, which she adopted again during the Leveson Inquiry when she gave evidence.

5. Jane Austen published her debut novel Sense and Sensibility using merely ‘A Lady’ in 1811. The fact that she was happy to show herself as a woman, but not identify herself further, has mystified academics ever since. 

6. Harper Lee dropped the ‘Nelle’ at the beginning of her name to publish her only novel, the autobiographical To Kill A Mockingbird. 

7. George Eliot was born Mary Ann Evans, and went on to author seven hugely successful novels, including Mill on the Floss and Middlemarch - which has been deemed the greatest novel in the English language by authors Martin Amis and Julian Barnes. She wanted to be taken seriously, and thus used her male pseudonym, and is still known as such today. 

8. An author used to both different languages and pen names, Karen Blixen has published under Isak Dinesen, Osceola and Pierre Andrézel and is famous for her novel Out Of Africa. 

9. Despite being deemed the “first modern writer for children” by biographer Julia Briggs, Edith ‘E.’ Nesbit published over 40 children’s books using her first initial, rather than her full name.

By Alice E. Vincent

wwnorton:

“Uncertainly, doubt, questioning. These are the innermost workings of literature. They are the writers’ true instruments. Is there any other mechanism that can sustain such extended and complex examination of ambiguity as a novel? That is what it was born for. In the digital world ambiguity is a bug or flaw to be worked out. In literature, it’s a chance to expand the definition of being.”

—Nicole Krauss, telling it like it is, at the 2011 PEN Awards Ceremony in New York